Traditional home making skills on the return

Traditional home making skills is making a revival as people look for a slower pace of life.

This is where I find myself at the moment - looking at ways to slow down and to discover more relaxed moments. I live a very busy lifestyle - I enjoy it most of the time, but there are times where I just want to stop, slow down and spend more time with my kids and hubby.

Today is the perfect example, first day back to work since having a week off and it was as busy as I dreaded.  I work fully from home, which I count myself very lucky (most of the time), but then on the flip side it can be just a pain (knowing when to switch off).  So today I logged into my work email, and as expected it was choc-a-bloc, then there were all the catch up Skype meetings I had, along with some urgent issues that needed attention - And, work is always organized/scheduled around my family, I will always put them first - i.e. as well as the normal back and forth school and nursery runs, I had to take my oldest to the local hospital for a blood test, take my youngest son to his swimming class and take the dogs to the vet. As well as try to clean and cook (hubby does most of the cooking).  Sometimes I just don't know how I do it.

I always try and squeeze in as much time as possible as I can to spend with the kids, and the best way I find this, is turning to more traditional home making skills - baking, crafting and growing veg for example - but I especially enjoy baking with the children, they love it too.  I've never been the 'cook' as hubby does 90% of the cooking, but for me when I get a chance, stepping into our kitchen to bake/cook is the time I get to switch off from work, and I get to slow down, and spend quality time with my kids - an added bonus, we get to learn some skills together, skills that will hopefully come in handy for my kids when they grow up.

A recent survey carried out by a UK based home interior Baytree Interiors found that traditional home making skills such as baking, sewing and preserving are having a revival after decades of decline - I can fully relate to this. 31% of participants chose baking as their favourite hobby. 21% expressed the desire to learn sewing and altering clothes. 

Where do people learn these new skills? Unsurprisingly 43% said online.

The popularity of food and DIY TV shows as well as an abundance of online tutorials, books and magazines has seen a big rise in the number of people wanting to learn these traditional skills. Over the past few years the internet has become a great resource for learning new skills, I for example often turn to YouTube on the hunt for helpful tutorials, or often searching and reading through forums and blogs to help find the information/help I need.

A spokesperson from Baytree Interiors had this to say about the survey: 
“It’s clear from the survey results that people are once again embracing traditional lifestyles and want to learn new skills that can help around the house. What’s more, the survey showed that it was in fact technology that is allowing people to learn these new skills through a range of diverse websites, video tutorials and step by step guides from around the internet.”